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Beth Harper Schacklette, WAC WWII
Beth Harper Schacklette, WAC WWII

Beth Harper Schacklette, WAC WWII

Claudia Hollingsworth Chambliss, CalCo Museum Co-Chairperson comes up with some amazing history and artifacts. Last week I received an email from her with the photo and brief memo of Mary Elizabeth “Beth” Hopper Schacklette (1925-1990). The photo accompanies this article. Claudia’s memo states “This is Beth Hopper Schacklette who served in the Women’s Army Corps during WWII. Beth was born and raised in Tinsman near Watson Cemetery. Her parents were Sidney Howard Hopper and Pearl Purvis Hopper. Howard was related to probably half of Tinsman and others that lived in Sparkman and Fordyce. Beth had four siblings: Frances, Ruth, Kenneth, and Roderick. Beth lived most of her life in Kentucky where she settled after the war and later married a native of Kentucky. She had two daughters and grandchildren that live in Kentucky as well.”

Be Thankful

With Thanksgiving next week, it’s hard to think what to be thankful with the way 2020 has been. We’ve been dealing with COVID, elections, and who knows what else. 2020 hasn’t been the best year it seems.

HISTORY MINUTE

HISTORY MINUTE

The Civil War saw neighbor fighting against neighbor, family against family, and brother against brother. In Arkansas, like so many other states that disintegrated into battlefields, Americans bled and died fighting other Americans. Like other southern states, most Arkansas troops signed up to fight for the Confederacy though there were a sizable number of Arkansans who fought in the Union Army. One Union soldier, William Perkins Black, became noted for his courage in battle while in Arkansas. Black was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for actions at the Battle of Pea Ridge, one of the few American troops ever awarded the nation’s highest military honor for actions taken in Arkansas.

Veterans Day

With the craziness of the election, it’s easy to forget Veterans Day coming up on November 11. Veterans Day is meant to honor military veterans. These veterans fought for our freedom. We still have the right to vote because of their service to the country.

HISTORY MINUTE

HISTORY MINUTE

Alcohol and drug addiction have been problems that have long plagued American society. It wrecks families and can drag honest men and women of integrity into lives of theft, lies, and illness in the pursuit of the next high. Recovery can be long and difficult, but not impossible. As the alcohol debate reached its height in the late 1800s, one woman proposed a more direct approach, one that made her a legend. Carrie Nation, the small woman armed with a hatchet, became a nightmare for bar patrons across the country.

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